New book: Soviet Anti-Alcohol Posters of the 1960s-’80s

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Thanks to its magical properties and ability to turn normal people into maniacs, alcohol really is a marvel. 
 
Russians, whose expertise in making home-made vodka in baths is known (and admired) around the world, are particularly fond of it: something that was as apparent in the days of the Soviet Union as it is today. 
 
Sadly, killjoy top brass in the ‘Party’ weren’t convinced alcohol’s effects were totally conducive to building a workers’ paradise. That’s why between the 1960s-’80s, they commissioned commercial artists to produce posters warning against its dangers. 
 
These have been now collated in a new book, Alcohol: Soviet Anti-Alcohol Posters, which, as you’d imagine is an entertaining read. And while we wouldn’t advise downing a skinful of bath-made voddy any time soon, it’s pleasing to note alcohol’s long relationship with great art pierced the Iron Curtain, too. 
 
Cheers!
 
Alcohol: Soviet Anti-Alcohol Posters is published by Fuel, priced £19.95. Get yours here
 
 







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